Torah E-Thought: Proper Hospitality

 
ב״ה
 
 
This Week at Lubavitch Centre of Leeds
Light Candles  - Leeds :
 
Friday, 6 Nov  4:04pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Shabbat Ends, 
5:13pm
 
Torah Portion: 
 

Lubavitch Centre of Leeds   Email: [email protected]   Phone: 0113-2663311www.JudaismLive.com

 
 
Message from the Rabbi
 
 
Dear Friend,

Last night we hosted Doron Kornbluth, a bestselling author and international speaker on our communal Zoom. You can watch it here. We’ve got some amazing speakers lined up over the coming weeks. You can see the schedule here.

Due to the national lockdown there are no services at Chabad Lubavitch Leeds until further notice.

Please join me at 2pm on Friday when I stream my pre-Shabbat thoughts in the Alwoodley Ward Residents Facebook Group. Alwoodley Ward residents can join the group here.

All our coronavirus support is online here.

Wishing you a Good Shabbos,

Rabbi Eli Pink
Director of Education
Chabad Lubavitch Leeds

.....................................

In the midst of conversing with G-d, Abraham sees three men approaching and runs to welcome them to his home. From Abraham’s behaviour, we learn that welcoming guests is greater than receiving the Shechinah, G-d’s Divine Presence.

As Maimonides writes: “This is the tenet that our patriarch Avraham established and the path of kindness that he followed. He would feed wayfarers, provide them with drink, and accompany them. Showing hospitality for guests surpasses receiving the Shechinah, the Divine Presence, as is written: ‘And he saw, and behold, there were three men.’”

Yet considering that Avraham’s guests were actually angels sent to heal him after his circumcision who had no need for the food and drink he offered, did Avraham actually fulfil the mitzvah of hachnosas orchim – welcoming guests - with this act of hospitality? In hindsight, it seems that Avraham disturbed his meeting with G-d for guests who do not even qualify for hachnosas orchim!

From here we see that hachnosas orchim is defined primarily by the heartfelt concern that the host shows for his guests’ well-being, and not by the accommodations he provides (in which case the extent of the beneficiary’s need would be relevant). Although giving with a smile enhances any form of kindness or charity, we know that the ideal way of giving charity is actually when the donor and recipient never even meet face to face. Not so the mitzvah of hachnosas orchim, where the fulfilment of this mitzvah is first and foremost through showing your guests your personal and sincere concern for their comfort and well-being.

Thus, regardless of whether the angels visiting Avraham needed or ate the food that he prepared for them, Avraham fulfilled the mitzvah of hachnosas orchim to the fullest with the care he exhibited toward them. Moreover, knowing (better than anyone) just how much Avraham was cherished by G-d, the guests, too, could appreciate the sincere interest this great man took in them, putting his meeting with G-d on hold in order to provide them with food and to escort them on their way.

Although we can’t currently practise traditional hachnosat orchim, we can still show our care and support each other.

 
 
 
Zoom Events

 

 
 
Upcoming Events
Introduction to Shabbat
Friday, Nov. 6, 2020 - 4:00 pm
Friday afternoon introduction to Shabbat on Facebook Live in the Alwoodley Residents’ Group as well as on Zoom.
For details contact Rabbi Eli Pink on 07875 320 344

More Info »
Ruth Bell's weekly session
Monday, Nov. 9, 2020 - 8:30 pm
Mondays 8.30pm
Ruth Bell's weekly class covers current and relevant points of interest in the yearly cycle beginning with counting the Omer; a look at the weekly sedra, and the daily schedule of Tanya (Chassidic teachings) and Tehillim (psalms).
Via Zoom. For details please contact Ruth on 07963 316 279

Hebrew Cool Club
Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020 - 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Hebrew Cool Club
Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020 - 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
3 Rabbis and a Dr walk into a Zoom
Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020 - 8:30 pm
With Guest Rabbi: Rabbi Mendy Lew from Stanmore United Synagogue
For details contact Rabbi Eli Pink on 07875 320 344

Introduction to Shabbat
Friday, Nov. 13, 2020 - 4:00 pm
Friday afternoon introduction to Shabbat on Facebook Live in the Alwoodley Residents’ Group as well as on Zoom.
For details contact Rabbi Eli Pink on 07875 320 344

More Info »
Ruth Bell's weekly session
Monday, Nov. 16, 2020 - 8:30 pm
Mondays 8.30pm
Ruth Bell's weekly class covers current and relevant points of interest in the yearly cycle beginning with counting the Omer; a look at the weekly sedra, and the daily schedule of Tanya (Chassidic teachings) and Tehillim (psalms).
Via Zoom. For details please contact Ruth on 07963 316 279

Hebrew Cool Club
Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020 - 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Hebrew Cool Club
Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020 - 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
3 Rabbis and a Dr walk into a Zoom
Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020 - 8:30 pm
Not for Women only. Women's panel with Guest speaker Rebbetzin Rivkie Pink from Leicester Hebrew Congregation
Introduction to Shabbat
Friday, Nov. 20, 2020 - 4:00 pm
Friday afternoon introduction to Shabbat on Facebook Live in the Alwoodley Residents’ Group as well as on Zoom.
For details contact Rabbi Eli Pink on 07875 320 344

More Info »
Ruth Bell's weekly session
Monday, Nov. 23, 2020 - 8:30 pm
Mondays 8.30pm
Ruth Bell's weekly class covers current and relevant points of interest in the yearly cycle beginning with counting the Omer; a look at the weekly sedra, and the daily schedule of Tanya (Chassidic teachings) and Tehillim (psalms).
Via Zoom. For details please contact Ruth on 07963 316 279

Hebrew Cool Club
Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020 - 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Hebrew Cool Club
Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020 - 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Communal Zoom
Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020 - 8:30 pm
Full session with Guest speaker Rabbi Avremi Zippel, Utah. I survived and I also thrived.
 
 
Having fun at Hebrew Cool Club!
     
 
 
 
Service Times

All services are suspended until further notice

 
 
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Parshah in a Nutshell

Parshat Vayeira

G‑d reveals Himself to Abraham three days after the first Jew’s circumcision at age ninety-nine; but Abraham rushes off to prepare a meal for three guests who appear in the desert heat. One of the three—who are angels disguised as men—announces that, in exactly one year, the barren Sarah will give birth to a son. Sarah laughs.

Abraham pleads with G‑d to spare the wicked city of Sodom. Two of the three disguised angels arrive in the doomed city, where Abraham’s nephew Lot extends his hospitality to them and protects them from the evil intentions of a Sodomite mob. The two guests reveal that they have come to overturn the place, and to save Lot and his family. Lot’s wife turns into a pillar of salt when she disobeys the command not to look back at the burning city as they flee.

While taking shelter in a cave, Lot’s two daughters (believing that they and their father are the only ones left alive in the world) get their father drunk, lie with him and become pregnant. The two sons born from this incident father the nations of Moab and Ammon.

Abraham moves to Gerar, where the Philistine king Abimelech takes Sarah—who is presented as Abraham’s sister—to his palace. In a dream, G‑d warns Abimelech that he will die unless he returns the woman to her husband. Abraham explains that he feared he would be killed over the beautiful Sarah.

G‑d remembers His promise to Sarah, and gives her and Abraham a son, who is named Isaac (Yitzchak, meaning “will laugh”). Isaac is circumcised at the age of eight days; Abraham is one hundred years old, and Sarah ninety, at their child’s birth.

Hagar and Ishmael are banished from Abraham’s home and wander in the desert; G‑d hears the cry of the dying lad, and saves his life by showing his mother a well. Abimelech makes a treaty with Abraham at Beersheba, where Abraham gives him seven sheep as a sign of their truce.

G-d tests Abraham’s devotion by commanding him to sacrifice Isaac on Mount Moriah (the Temple Mount) in Jerusalem. Isaac is bound and placed on the altar, and Abraham raises the knife to slaughter his son. A voice from heaven calls to stop him; a ram, caught in the undergrowth by its horns, is offered in Isaac’s place. Abraham receives the news of the birth of a daughter, Rebecca, to his nephew Bethuel.