Torah E-Thought: Rinse well before serving

ב״ה

 
This Week at Lubavitch Centre of Leeds
Candle Lighting Times for Leeds:
 
Friday,  13 March 5:49pm
 
Shabbat Ends:
14 March 6:57pm
 
Torah Portion:  K i Tisa
 

Lubavitch Centre of Leeds   Email: office@judaismlive.com   Phone: 0113-2663311www.JudaismLive.com

 
 
Message from the Rabbi
 
 
Dear Friend,

 

I hope you had a great Purim! We had an amazing time at Chabad Lubavitch with five Purim parties, 19 Megillah Readings and hundreds of Mishloach Manos given out in schools, offices, old age homes, hospitals and private homes across Leeds, Harrogate and Bradford. You can see some of the action in our picture album here!

With Purim behind us, that means Pesach is under a month away! Our sale of chametz form is now online here and our website has loads of articles, videos and recipes at www.JudaismLive.com/Pesach.

Wishing you a Good Shabbos,


Rabbi Eli Pink
Director of Education
Chabad Lubavitch Leeds

......................

There is a meme going around: It’s the year 2020, we thought we’d be driving flying cars, instead we’re teaching people how to wash their hands…

Washing hands has always been an integral part of Judaism. In addition to washing for bread, we are supposed to wash upon waking, before prayer and after using the toilet. In fact in the Middle Ages this hand washing protected the Jews from the Black Death to the degree that they were accused of being behind the plague.

In this week’s parshah we read about how each morning before the daily service, the kohanim serving in the Mishkan would wash their hands and feet. Emulating this practice, we too wash our hands every morning upon awakening, to sanctify ourselves for a new day in the service of G-d.

Maimonides however goes further and writes that before the morning prayers, one must wash not only one’s hands (and feet), but also one’s face - something which was not even required before the daily service in the Mishkan. This implies that our daily prayers, which replace the service in the Temple, require even more preparation than was necessary for the service in the Mishkan and Beit Hamikdash.

This additional preparation reflects the unique challenges that a Jew faces in exile, in contrast to those faced by Jews of Temple times.

Hands and feet serve as the body’s primary means of physical activity. The face, in contrast, is home to our higher faculties and senses, such as sight and speech. The face thus represents the things that we are involved in not only technically, but also mentally and emotionally.

In the times of the Mishkan and Beit Hamikdash, the Jewish people, particularly the kohanim, were in an ideal spiritual state: they occupied their hearts and minds almost exclusively with holy pursuits. They had a limited involvement with the mundane material world in order to sustain themselves physically, but this was only in deed, not in spirit. The kohanim therefore needed only to rinse their hands and feet, metaphorically washing off the mundane activities, and then they were ready to devote themselves to the sacred service in the Temple.

Under the stresses and confusion of exile, however, it is not uncommon that material concerns occupy a Jew’s innermost thoughts and feelings. The preparations for prayer today therefore require washing even your face, according to the Maimonides, in order to metaphorically wash away our internal engrossment in the material world and ready ourselves for focused service of G-d.

 
 
 
Upcoming Event

 
 
Upcoming Events
Friday Night Service
Friday, Mar. 13, 2020 - 5:34 pm
Candle Lighting
Friday, Mar. 13, 2020 - 5:49 pm
Chassidus Class
Shabbat, Mar. 14, 2020 - 9:30 am - 10:00 am
Join us for a Chassidus Class with coffee and cake.
Shabbat Morning Minyan
Shabbat, Mar. 14, 2020 - 10:00 am
Warm & Friendly Shabbat service followed by kiddush and Mincha.
Sunday Morning Minyan
Sunday, Mar. 15, 2020 - 8:30 am
Lunch and Learn in the City Centre
Monday, Mar. 16, 2020 - 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Bagels and brain storming on the weekly Parshah and contemporary events. Weekly excluding public Holidays at Ward Hadaway Solicitors, Wellington Street.
More Info »
Ladies Class
Monday, Mar. 16, 2020 - 8:30 pm
Contact Mrs Bell for details on 07963 316 279
Friday Night Service
Friday, Mar. 20, 2020 - 5:47 pm
Candle Lighting
Friday, Mar. 20, 2020 - 6:02 pm
Chassidus Class
Shabbat, Mar. 21, 2020 - 9:30 am - 10:00 am
Join us for a Chassidus Class with coffee and cake.
Shabbat Morning Minyan
Shabbat, Mar. 21, 2020 - 10:00 am
Warm & Friendly Shabbat service followed by kiddush and Mincha.
Sunday Morning Minyan
Sunday, Mar. 22, 2020 - 8:30 am
Lunch and Learn in the City Centre
Monday, Mar. 23, 2020 - 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Bagels and brain storming on the weekly Parshah and contemporary events. Weekly excluding public Holidays at Ward Hadaway Solicitors, Wellington Street.
More Info »
Ladies Class
Monday, Mar. 23, 2020 - 8:30 pm
Contact Mrs Bell for details on 07963 316 279
Friday Night Service
Friday, Mar. 27, 2020 - 6:00 pm
 
 
Purim 5780
 
 
Service Times

Sunday Morning 
8.30 am

Friday Night 
15 minutes before Candle Lighting

Shabbat Day
10.00 am

 
 
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Parshah in a Nutshell

Parshat Ki Tisa

The people of Israel are told to each contribute exactly half a shekel of silver to the Sanctuary. Instructions are also given regarding the making of the Sanctuary’s water basin, anointing oil and incense. “Wise-hearted” artisans Betzalel and Aholiav are placed in charge of the Sanctuary’s construction, and the people are once again commanded to keep the Shabbat.

When Moses does not return when expected from Mount Sinai, the people make a golden calf and worship it. G‑d proposes to destroy the errant nation, but Moses intercedes on their behalf. Moses descends from the mountain carrying the tablets of the testimony engraved with the Ten Commandments; seeing the people dancing about their idol, he breaks the tablets, destroys the golden calf, and has the primary culprits put to death. He then returns to G‑d to say: “If You do not forgive them, blot me out from the book that You have written.”

G‑d forgives, but says that the effect of their sin will be felt for many generations. At first G‑d proposes to send His angel along with them, but Moses insists that G‑d Himself accompany His people to the promised land.

Moses prepares a new set of tablets and once more ascends the mountain, where G‑d reinscribes the covenant on these second tablets. On the mountain, Moses is also granted a vision of the divine thirteen attributes of mercy. So radiant is Moses’ face upon his return, that he must cover it with a veil, which he removes only to speak with G‑d and to teach His laws to the people.

 


Parshat Parah

In preparation for the upcoming festival of Passover, when every Jew had to be in a state of ritual purity, the section of Parah (Numbers 19) is added to the weekly reading this week. Parah relates the laws of the Red Heifer with which a person contaminated by contact with a dead body was purified.